What is Cross Browser Testing with 11 tools?

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What is Cross Browser Testing?
What is Cross Browser Testing?

What is Cross Browser Testing?

Now a days we talk more on browser compatibility. Every Manual Testing is having a mandate part as Browser Compatibility.Web browser is a translation device. It takes a document written in the HTML language and translates it into a formatted Web page.What happens in HTML. It converts the HTML code to machine language and sends through wire by binary format.The receiving device(mobile and computer) catches the binary code and converts that code to HTML. After that it shows to the user.

Let me jump into the problem.Very few people code HTML by hand anymore. There are a multiplicity of programs such as DreamWeaver and Microsoft Front Page which help make the process of web page creation easier.The basic rules for translating HTML documents are established by the World Wide Web consortium, which publishes the official HTML standards. But there’s considerable room for interpretation within those ground rules.

For example, the HTML standards say that the TABLE tag should support a CELLSPACING attribute to define the space between parts of the table. But standards don’t define the default value for that attribute, so unless you explicitly define CELLSPACING when building your page, two browsers may use different amounts of white space in your table.
In addition, the HTML standards usually run ahead of what the browsers support.

No browser as yet supports 100% of the HTML Version 5 standard, but some browsers come closer than others. Over the past few years Internet Explorer has done a much better job of this than Netscape Navigator, though Opera has done arguably the best job.But since support for the latest HTML tags isn’t universal, you could be building your pages with parts of the language that not all browsers understand. In that case the browser will ignore that part of your page it can’t translate, and the way your page displays will be affected.

One of the greatest problems with CSS, or Cascading Style Sheets, is the issue of cross browser compatibility. What may look great in Mozilla browsers looks terrible in Internet Explorer, and may totally break in Netscape. The biggest mistake a web designer or developer using CSS can make is to design for only one browser, or to assume that since the largest group of viewers use IE, to disregard its flaws that are apparent in other browsers.

The new cutting edge Ajax technology is also browser dependent.So Browser compatibility testing is must for Ajax based Application.In the case of business-to-consumer (B2C) style web applications, cross-browser compatibility will generally be necessary. Customers resent being told which product to use and they may not have disk space to load a second browser on their hard drive. Also, certain ISPs support only one browser. If your browser choice conflict with the ISP, you have put your customer in a difficult situation.

In business-to-business (B2B) web application, you may be able to insist that a particular browser be selected. It will depend on your relationship with the counter-parties, standards in that industry and the number of counter-parties involved.The cross browser problem is getting complicated by browser-specific “HTML extensions.” Back during the heyday of the Browser Wars, both Netscape and Microsoft tried to get a competitive edge by running ahead of the HTML standards, inventing their own tags and attributes.Those are basically
custom tags and attributes only viewed in the compatible browser only.

Browser compatibility and strategy for testing:

Different Browser Versions

The major difference between two versions of the same browser is their support for newer portions of the HTML language. A new browser is generally better at displaying Web pages than an old one.However, Internet users tend to upgrade their browser based on the addition of new features, like email integration and instant messaging. If a user doesn’t care about these features, they’re happy to keep surfing the Web with their old browser.If IE doesn’t quite understand something, like sloppy code or unsupported features, it attempts to do something anyway, instead of simply ignoring them, like Mozilla and Netscape based browsers. Unfortunately, this results in major headaches for CSS developers. Microsoft has attempted to help “dumb down” coding issues, resulting in more developers that write sloppy code, by having the browser anticipate the design. There are obvious problems with this concept. In my humble opinion, CSS code should be written, validated, and 100% compliant with the standards.

A best wayout is to design pages to work for the last two versions of the major browsers.
Also note that new browser versions sometimes represent major changes in a browser, and in these cases all bets on the browser’s behavior are off.For example, Navigator Version 6.1 is a complete rewrite of Netscape’s browser, so a page that worked well under Navigator Version 4 may not work under Version 6. That’s especially true if you use Dynamic HTML on your pages.

Different Computer Types

The Macintosh is still used by 12% of computer users, and has a very loyal following among graphic designers and publishers. In theory, if you view your page on both a PC and a Mac using the same version of the same browser, it should display the same, right?In practice that’s rarely the case. There are three reasons for this:

Font Availability.

When you tell your Web page to use a particular typeface, such as “Arial,” you may not always get the font you want. Fonts are a computer resource, and not all computers have the same fonts as your computer. That’s true even between different PCs, but it’s especially true between the PC and the Mac. If the typeface of your page suddenly changes between these computers, you’ve probably used a font that isn’t available on both computer types.

Font Size.

The Mac will generally render your typeface in a smaller pixel size than the PC will. That’s especially true if you use the FONT tag to set your type size, since this tag uses abstract units to define size. You can avoid this problem is you use Cascading Style Sheets to set your font size in pixels. ac.

Internet Explorer:

Microsoft outsources the development of Internet Explorer for the Mac, and so to a large extent this is a different browser from the PC version. In particular, the Mac version of Internet Explorer is prone to quirks and bugs that you won’t see in the PC version. If you check your Web page under only one browser on the Mac, do so under Internet Explorer!

Different Screen Sizes

If you don’t test your pages using different screen resolutions, your page may be stretched to fit a large screen, or be cropped to fit a small screen.

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